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Dubliners / James Joyce

By: Joyce, James, 1882-1941
Material type: TextTextSeries: Everyman's library: 49Publisher: New York : Knopf, 1991Distributor: Distributed by Random House Edition: 1st edDescription: lxvii, 7-287 pages ; 21 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0679405747; 9780679405740Subject(s): : Dublin (Ireland) -- Fiction: Short stories. | Domestic fiction | Dublin (Ireland) -- FictionGenre/Form: Short stories. | Domestic fiction.DDC classification: 823/.912 LOC classification: PR6019.O9 | D8 1991bDissertation note: Though James Joyce began these stories of Dublin life in 1904 when he was twenty-two and completed them in 1907, their unconventional themes and language led to repeated rejections by publishers and delayed publication until 1914. In the century since, his story “The Dead” has come to be seen as one of the most powerful evocations of human loss and longing that the English language possesses; all the other stories in Dubliners are as beautifully turned and as greatly admired. They remind us once again that James Joyce was not only modernism’s chief innovator but also one of its most intimate and poetic writers. Summary: A classic collection of the great literary pioneer's early work, the fifteen short stories evoke the character and atmosphere of the Irish city at the turn of the century
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823.912 J.J.D 1991 (Browse shelf) Available 2050

Though James Joyce began these stories of Dublin life in 1904 when he was twenty-two and completed them in 1907, their unconventional themes and language led to repeated rejections by publishers and delayed publication until 1914. In the century since, his story “The Dead” has come to be seen as one of the most powerful evocations of human loss and longing that the English language possesses; all the other stories in Dubliners are as beautifully turned and as greatly admired. They remind us once again that James Joyce was not only modernism’s chief innovator but also one of its most intimate and poetic writers.

Includes bibliographical references (p. l-lv)

A classic collection of the great literary pioneer's early work, the fifteen short stories evoke the character and atmosphere of the Irish city at the turn of the century

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