35986841_10216840653711318_1105697261150535680_n

King Lear

By: Shakespeare, WilliamMaterial type: TextTextCopyright date: 2009Description: illContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 5552499936DDC classification: 813.54 Dissertation note: The historical basis for “King Lear” comes from Geoffrey of Monmouth’s account of the legendary King Leir of the Britons recorded in the historian’s “History of the Kings of Briton.” King Lear is an elderly man and wishes to retire from power. In the decision to divide up his estate he requests that his daughters profess their feelings for him, vowing to give whomever loves him the most the largest share. His two eldest daughters Regan and Goneril go first and based on their responses are rewarded their respective portions. However when it is his youngest daughter Cordelia’s turn, she refuses to flatter her father as her older sisters have done, insisting that there are no words to describe her love. This enrages the King prompting him to disinherit Cordelia and split the remaining inheritance amongst the two eldest sisters instead. As the play progresses, the foolishness of this decision becomes evident, descending the King into madness. In its portrayal of the tragic effect of human weakness and cruelty, “King Lear” has come to be regarded as one of the most powerful of Shakespeare’s works. This edition is printed on premium acid-free paper, is annotated by Henry N. Hudson, and includes an introduction by Charles Harold Herford.
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Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26229
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26230
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26231
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26232
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26233
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26234
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 26235
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 12473-2
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 22604
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 22605
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 24302
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 S.W.K 2009 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 12473-1

LT203

The historical basis for “King Lear” comes from Geoffrey of Monmouth’s account of the legendary King Leir of the Britons recorded in the historian’s “History of the Kings of Briton.” King Lear is an elderly man and wishes to retire from power. In the decision to divide up his estate he requests that his daughters profess their feelings for him, vowing to give whomever loves him the most the largest share. His two eldest daughters Regan and Goneril go first and based on their responses are rewarded their respective portions. However when it is his youngest daughter Cordelia’s turn, she refuses to flatter her father as her older sisters have done, insisting that there are no words to describe her love. This enrages the King prompting him to disinherit Cordelia and split the remaining inheritance amongst the two eldest sisters instead. As the play progresses, the foolishness of this decision becomes evident, descending the King into madness. In its portrayal of the tragic effect of human weakness and cruelty, “King Lear” has come to be regarded as one of the most powerful of Shakespeare’s works. This edition is printed on premium acid-free paper, is annotated by Henry N. Hudson, and includes an introduction by Charles Harold Herford.

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