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Mansfield Park / Jane Austen ; with an introduction by Peter Conrad.

By: Austen, Jane, 1775-1817
Material type: TextTextSeries: Everyman's library ; 52Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 1992Edition: 1st edDescription: xxxvii, 488 p. ; 21 cmISBN: 0679412697 :Subject(s): Young women -- Fiction | Children of the rich -- Fiction | Country homes -- Fiction | Adoptees -- Fiction | Cousins -- Fiction | Uncles -- Fiction | England -- FictionGenre/Form: Domestic fiction. | Love stories.DDC classification: 823.7 LOC classification: PR4034 | .M3 1992Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description Summary: At the center of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park is Fanny Price, the classic “poor cousin” who has been brought to live with the rich Sir Thomas Bertram and his wife as an act of charity. Over time, Fanny comes to demonstrate forcibly those virtues Austen most admired: modesty, firm principles, and a loving heart. As Fanny watches her cousins Maria and Julia cast aside their scruples in dangerous flirtations (and worse), and as she herself resolutely resists the advantages of marriage to the fascinating but morally unsteady Henry Crawford, her seeming austerity grows in appeal and makes clear why she was Austen’s own favorite among her heroines. Mansfield Park encompasses not only Austen’s great comedic gifts and her genius as a historian of the human animal, but her personal credo as well—her faith in a social order that combats chaos through civil grace, decency, and wit. With an introduction by Peter Conrad. (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)
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823.7 A.J.M 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 2052

At the center of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park is Fanny Price, the classic “poor cousin” who has been brought to live with the rich Sir Thomas Bertram and his wife as an act of charity. Over time, Fanny comes to demonstrate forcibly those virtues Austen most admired: modesty, firm principles, and a loving heart. As Fanny watches her cousins Maria and Julia cast aside their scruples in dangerous flirtations (and worse), and as she herself resolutely resists the advantages of marriage to the fascinating but morally unsteady Henry Crawford, her seeming austerity grows in appeal and makes clear why she was Austen’s own favorite among her heroines.

Mansfield Park encompasses not only Austen’s great comedic gifts and her genius as a historian of the human animal, but her personal credo as well—her faith in a social order that combats chaos through civil grace, decency, and wit. With an introduction by Peter Conrad.

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)

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