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Molecular Communication \ Nakano, Tadashi.

By: Nakano, Tadashi
Contributor(s): Eckford, Andrew W | Haraguchi, Tokuko
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 online resource (194 p.)ISBN: 9781107291218Subject(s): Molecular communication (Telecommunication) | Molecules | NanotechnologyGenre/Form: Electronic booksAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 620.5 LOC classification: TKOnline resources: Safari Connect to this resource online (off-campus access) | Safari Connect to this resource online (off-campus access)
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Copyright; Title; Contents; Preface; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Molecular communication: Why, what, and how?; 1.1.1 Why molecular communication?; 1.1.2 What uses molecular communication?; 1.1.3 How does it work? A quick introduction; 1.2 A history of molecular communication; 1.2.1 Early history and theoretical research; 1.2.2 More recent theoretical research; 1.2.3 Implementational aspects; 1.2.4 Contemporary research; 1.3 Applications areas; 1.3.1 Biological engineering; 1.3.2 Medical and healthcare applications; 1.3.3 Industrial applications; 1.3.4 Environmental applications
1.3.5 Information and communication technology applications1.4 Rationale and organization of the book; References; 2 Nature-made biological nanomachines; 2.1 Protein molecules; 2.1.1 Molecular structure; 2.1.2 Functions and roles; 2.2 DNA and RNA molecules; 2.2.1 Molecular structure; 2.2.2 Functions and roles; 2.3 Lipid membranes and vesicles; 2.3.1 Molecular structure; 2.3.2 Functions and roles; 2.4 Whole cells; 2.5 Conclusion and summary; References; 3 Molecular communication in biological systems; 3.1 Scales of molecular communication; 3.2 Modes of molecular communication
3.3 Examples of molecular communication3.3.1 Chemotactic signaling; 3.3.2 Vesicular trafficking; 3.3.3 Calcium signaling; 3.3.4 Quorum sensing; 3.3.5 Bacterial migration and conjugation; 3.3.6 Morphogen signaling; 3.3.7 Hormonal signaling; 3.3.8 Neuronal signaling; 3.4 Conclusion and summary; References; 4 Molecular communication paradigm; 4.1 Molecular communication model; 4.2 General characteristics; 4.2.1 Transmission of information molecules; 4.2.2 Information representation; 4.2.3 Slow speed and limited range; 4.2.4 Stochastic communication; 4.2.5 Massive parallelization
4.2.6 Energy efficiency4.2.7 Biocompatibility; 4.3 Molecular communication network architecture; 4.3.1 Physical layer; 4.3.2 Link layer; 4.3.3 Network layer; 4.3.4 Upper layers and other issues; 4.4 Conclusion and summary; References; 5 Mathematical modeling and simulation; 5.1 Discrete diffusion and Brownian motion; 5.1.1 Environmental assumptions; 5.1.2 The Wiener process; 5.1.3 Markov property; 5.1.4 Wiener process with drift; 5.1.5 Multi-dimensional Wiener processes; 5.1.6 Simulation; 5.2 Molecular motors; 5.3 First arrival times; 5.3.1 Definition and closed-form examples
5.3.2 First arrival times in multiple dimensions5.3.3 From first arrival times to communication systems; 5.4 Concentration, mole fraction, and counting; 5.4.1 Small numbers of molecules: Counting and inter-symbol interference; 5.4.2 Large numbers of molecules: Towards concentration; 5.4.3 Concentration: random and deterministic; 5.4.4 Concentration as a Gaussian random variable; 5.4.5 Concentration as a random process; 5.4.6 Discussion and communication example; 5.5 Models for ligand-receptor systems; 5.5.1 Mathematical model of a ligand-receptor system; 5.5.2 Simulation
In: Safari books onlineSummary: A comprehensive guide written by pioneers in the field, providing a detailed introduction to the state of the art in molecular communication
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Centeral Library
Second Floor - Biotechnology
620.5 N.T.M 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 21721
Books Books Centeral Library
Second Floor - Biotechnology
620.5 N.T.M 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 21722

Includes bibliographical references and index

Cover; Half Title; Copyright; Title; Contents; Preface; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Molecular communication: Why, what, and how?; 1.1.1 Why molecular communication?; 1.1.2 What uses molecular communication?; 1.1.3 How does it work? A quick introduction; 1.2 A history of molecular communication; 1.2.1 Early history and theoretical research; 1.2.2 More recent theoretical research; 1.2.3 Implementational aspects; 1.2.4 Contemporary research; 1.3 Applications areas; 1.3.1 Biological engineering; 1.3.2 Medical and healthcare applications; 1.3.3 Industrial applications; 1.3.4 Environmental applications

1.3.5 Information and communication technology applications1.4 Rationale and organization of the book; References; 2 Nature-made biological nanomachines; 2.1 Protein molecules; 2.1.1 Molecular structure; 2.1.2 Functions and roles; 2.2 DNA and RNA molecules; 2.2.1 Molecular structure; 2.2.2 Functions and roles; 2.3 Lipid membranes and vesicles; 2.3.1 Molecular structure; 2.3.2 Functions and roles; 2.4 Whole cells; 2.5 Conclusion and summary; References; 3 Molecular communication in biological systems; 3.1 Scales of molecular communication; 3.2 Modes of molecular communication

3.3 Examples of molecular communication3.3.1 Chemotactic signaling; 3.3.2 Vesicular trafficking; 3.3.3 Calcium signaling; 3.3.4 Quorum sensing; 3.3.5 Bacterial migration and conjugation; 3.3.6 Morphogen signaling; 3.3.7 Hormonal signaling; 3.3.8 Neuronal signaling; 3.4 Conclusion and summary; References; 4 Molecular communication paradigm; 4.1 Molecular communication model; 4.2 General characteristics; 4.2.1 Transmission of information molecules; 4.2.2 Information representation; 4.2.3 Slow speed and limited range; 4.2.4 Stochastic communication; 4.2.5 Massive parallelization

4.2.6 Energy efficiency4.2.7 Biocompatibility; 4.3 Molecular communication network architecture; 4.3.1 Physical layer; 4.3.2 Link layer; 4.3.3 Network layer; 4.3.4 Upper layers and other issues; 4.4 Conclusion and summary; References; 5 Mathematical modeling and simulation; 5.1 Discrete diffusion and Brownian motion; 5.1.1 Environmental assumptions; 5.1.2 The Wiener process; 5.1.3 Markov property; 5.1.4 Wiener process with drift; 5.1.5 Multi-dimensional Wiener processes; 5.1.6 Simulation; 5.2 Molecular motors; 5.3 First arrival times; 5.3.1 Definition and closed-form examples

5.3.2 First arrival times in multiple dimensions5.3.3 From first arrival times to communication systems; 5.4 Concentration, mole fraction, and counting; 5.4.1 Small numbers of molecules: Counting and inter-symbol interference; 5.4.2 Large numbers of molecules: Towards concentration; 5.4.3 Concentration: random and deterministic; 5.4.4 Concentration as a Gaussian random variable; 5.4.5 Concentration as a random process; 5.4.6 Discussion and communication example; 5.5 Models for ligand-receptor systems; 5.5.1 Mathematical model of a ligand-receptor system; 5.5.2 Simulation

A comprehensive guide written by pioneers in the field, providing a detailed introduction to the state of the art in molecular communication

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