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Shakespeare and the eighteenth century / Michael Caines.

By: Caines, Michael
Material type: TextTextSeries: Oxford Shakespeare topics: Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013Description: xxvii, 222 p. ; 21 cmISBN: 9780199642380 (hbk); 0199642389 (hbk); 9780199642373 (pbk); 0199642370 (bbk)Other title: Shakespeare and the 18th centurySubject(s): Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Influence | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Criticism and interpretation -- History -- 18th century | Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Dramatic production -- History -- 18th century | History and criticismDDC classification: 813.54 LOC classification: PR2968 | .C35 2013Dissertation note: This book considers the impact and influence of Shakespeare on writing of the eighteenth century, and also how eighteenth-century Shakespeare scholarship influenced how we read Shakespeare today. The most influential English actor of the eighteenth century, David Garrick, could hail Shakespeare as 'the god of our idolatry', yet perform an adaptation of King Lear with a happy ending, add a dying speech to Macbeth, and remove the puns from Romeo and Juliet. Garrick's friend Samuel Johnson thought of Shakespeare as 'above all writers, at least above all modern writers, the poet of nature'. Voltaire thought he was a sublime genius without taste. The Bluestocking Elizabeth Montagu, meanwhile, could be found arguing with Johnson's biographer James Boswell over whether Shakespeare or Milton was the greater poet.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 C.M.S 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 22720
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 C.M.S 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 22721
Books Books Centeral Library
First floor - Languages
813.54 C.M.S 2013 (Browse shelf) Available 22722

This book considers the impact and influence of Shakespeare on writing of the eighteenth century, and also how eighteenth-century Shakespeare scholarship influenced how we read Shakespeare today.

The most influential English actor of the eighteenth century, David Garrick, could hail Shakespeare as 'the god of our idolatry', yet perform an adaptation of King Lear with a happy ending, add a dying speech to Macbeth, and remove the puns from Romeo and Juliet. Garrick's friend Samuel Johnson thought of Shakespeare as 'above all writers, at least above all modern writers, the poet of nature'. Voltaire thought he was a sublime genius without taste. The Bluestocking Elizabeth Montagu, meanwhile, could be found arguing with Johnson's biographer James Boswell over whether Shakespeare or Milton was the greater poet.

Includes bibliographical references (pages [179]-201) and index.

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